TSTT shops fiber connections to communities

Above: A bmobile representative demonstrates the company’s services. Photo courtesy bmobile.

The growing demand for faster internet connections is being fueled by the increasing number of connected devices and services that consumers are adopting as part of their lives. This has informed TSTT’s multi-billion-dollar development plans, a key component of which is to make high speed fiber access a standard for homes and businesses throughout Trinidad and Tobago.

On Saturday 27 May, 2017, bmobile home solutions hosted a special ‘Green Family Day’ at the Francis Seupaul Recreation Grounds in Debe to launch its latest Fiber service offerings and packages with that community. 

Globally, avenues of communication have been advancing at a rapid pace and T&T’s leading communications solutions provider, bmobile, has been working assiduously to expand and enhance service offerings that are in keeping with technology trends.

Through bmobile’s fresh Fiber Promotions, customers can now surf the internet with speeds up to 100Mbps, get unlimited landline to landline calls, bring the best of Hollywood into their living rooms via entertainment packages and also beef up home security systems.

“Our Fiber Service is the next step in modernising communications technology in homes to support ‘smart homes’ and other enhanced applications. Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) will dramatically elevate the connection speeds available to computers, mobile devices and Internet of Things (IoT) connected appliances and electronics. 

More importantly is the bandwidth supporting connectivity to all of these devices simultaneously without compromising the user experience,” explained TSTT’s Vice-President Marketing, Camille Campbell.

As compared to copper technology, fiber is many times faster, it can carry data over longer distances without degrading quality, has lower latency (upload/download delay); and is better guarded against electromagnetic interference.

Back in Debe, as scores of children bounced around in the bouncy castles, befriended animals in the petting zoo or took in the spectacle of the magical show, host Tim Tim had his hands full with   scores of interested persons signing up for new fiber services. 

“I took the bmobile Fiber package because I’m displeased with the other service provider I have at home,” said Seuraj Gangaram. “So I took the advice from my family members who said that bmobile has much better internet plans. I have a lot of devices at home which use internet, so the high speed would be very useful to me, my wife and kids. Generally, this will benefit my entire family overall.”

Wendell Mooklal, another Debe resident, also signed up for a fiber bundle and was eager to get connected. “We saw the promotional event going on and I stopped to have a look. While looking into the available packages, I saw that they were really good and most of all, the offer (sign up) was free.”

“With a high-speed home connection, I can get some of my favourite movie channels for free and the price was very reasonable compared to the others. Fiber-optics is a better option for me especially since a lot of my friends have sworn by it. I also have three children and they will definitely make use of the faster internet.”

Over the next few weeks, bmobile will take its fiber caravan to more corners of the twin-island republic giving new and existing customers a chance to amplify their residential internet, entertainment and security system solutions. There are several packages to choose from, with economical options for almost every household.

  • Taran Rampersad

    I have a very mixed feeling about TSTT’s moves forward, largely because I see their moving forward as reverse privatization. The Government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago (GoRTT) still holds, as I recall, a controlling share in the company – which effectively makes TSTT an extension of the government.

    This does not mean I am against TSTT or GoRTT – it just means that I would like to see a separation so that it becomes clear that TSTT stands on it’s own.